Revolution Lullabye

February 17, 2008

Helen J. Schwartz and Lillian S. Bridwell-Bownes. “A Selected Bibliography on Computers in Composition: An Update.”

Filed under: Uncategorized — by revolutionlullabye @ 8:37 pm
Tags: , , , , , ,

Helen J. Schwartz and Lillian S. Bridwell-Bownes. “A Selected Bibliography on Computers in Composition: An Update.” CCC. 38:4 (Dec 1987): 453-457.

This bibliography updates the 1984 CCC bibliography on computers in composition. All the material in the bibliography was published between 1984 and 1987.

Corbett, Edward P.J. “Teaching Composition: Where We’ve Been and Where We’re Going.”

Corbett, Edward P.J. “Teaching Composition: Where We’ve Been and Where We’re Going.” CCC 38:4 (Dec 1987): 444-452.

This is the second personal perspective essays published in CCC, and in it, Corbett surveys the direction the field has gone during his academic career.  He points at the enhanced professionalism of compositionists, the growth of the graduate programs, the increase in published books on the history, practice, and theory of composition, special conferences in specific sub-topics in the field, and the growth of new journals and new research practices to report in those journals. He also details the changes he’s seen in the teaching of composition, specifically more attention paid to technical and business writing, writing across the curriculum initiatives, English as a second language, the development of cognitive skills in students, and the writing process. He warns teachers, though, that they must constantly evaluate how they teach to make sure they are doing everything possible to help their students be better writers.

Brand, Alice G. “The Why of Cognition: Emotion and the Writing Process.”

Filed under: Uncategorized — by revolutionlullabye @ 7:58 pm
Tags: , , , , , , ,

Brand, Alice G. “The Why of Cognition: Emotion and the Writing Process.” CCC 38:4 (Dec 1987): 436-443.

Brand accuses the field of side-stepping the importance of the affect in the composing process and asserts that the affect plays a central role in writing, as writing is an act of decision making, choices, and motivation, all which derive from affect, not cognition. She contests the notion that the best writing is emotionally neutral, citing that as humans, we have moral orientations and beliefs that result in commitments that are not disposable. Pure cognitive research in writing has its limits, and in order to fully understand the writing process, researchers must look for the connection and collaboration between the emotion and cognition in writing.

McLeod, Susan. “Some Thoughts about Feelings: The Affective Domain and the Writing Process.”

McLeod, Susan. “Some Thoughts about Feelings: The Affective Domain and the Writing Process.” CCC 38:4 (Dec 1987): 426-435.

McLeod writes that composition studies would benefit from more research on the emotional or affective aspect of writing as it relates to writing anxiety, motivation, and cultural and personal beliefs about writing. She proposes a theory of affect based on George Mandler from which to study these three areas. She claims that it is impossible to write without triggering some emotions, and instructors should help their students channel their emotions so that they enable them during the writing process instead of impede them.

Witte, Stephen P.

Filed under: Uncategorized — by revolutionlullabye @ 7:38 pm
Tags: , , , , ,

Witte, Stephen P. “Pre-Text and Composing.” CCC 38:4 (Dec 1987): 397-425.

Witte argues that the writer’s pre-text, or mental construction of “text” prior to transcription, is such an important composing phenomenon that there must be more theoretical and empirical research in writing on it, specifically think-aloud protocols. From his own research on college freshmen’s pre-texts, he makes four observations about pre-text: pre-text directly affects the direction of the written text; pre-text can be stored in the writer’s memory and used in the text; revising pre-text uses the same strategies as revising written text; and pre-text is not a rigid step in the composing process but a necessary link between translating ideas to written text.

Larson, Richard L. “Selected Bibliography of Scholarship in Composition and Rhetoric, 1986.”

Filed under: Uncategorized — by revolutionlullabye @ 5:06 pm
Tags: ,

Larson, Richard L. “Selected Bibliography of Scholarship in Composition and Rhetoric, 1986.” CCC 38:3 (Oct 1987): 319-336.

This is an update of the selected bibliography of scholarship in composition and rhetoric published in CCC in 1978.  It is organized into the following categories: theories of communication/knowledge; rhetorical theory and performance; processes of thought in composing; composing processes; language/text structure; student development; research processes; instructional advice/tutoring/testing/assignments; instructional trends historical/recent; writing/literacy across the curriculum; writing in non-academic situations; and teacher development.

Arrington, Phillip and Shirley K Rose. “Prologues to What Is Possible: Introductions as Metadiscourse.”

Filed under: Uncategorized — by revolutionlullabye @ 4:59 pm
Tags: , , , , , , ,

Arrington, Phillip and Shirley K Rose. “Prologues to What Is Possible: Introductions as Metadiscourse.” CCC 38:3 (Oct 1987): 306-318.

Introductions are both text about text, or metadiscourse, and text about content, and contemporary composition textbooks do not do an adequate job teaching students about this dual role of introductions. Arrington and Rose use Aristotle’s description of the purpose of introductions, situating the text in a greater context and identifying the audience and speaker, and Grice’s maxims to analyze four student-written introductions. One of the main problems for students is that the formulas they are given for writing introductions do not help them balance writing for both the teacher and a larger audience, and teachers should show students how to understand the constraints and contexts of the writing situations they will encounter.

Dasenbrock, Reed Way. “J.L. Austin and the Articulation of a New Rhetoric.”

Filed under: Uncategorized — by revolutionlullabye @ 4:40 pm
Tags: , , , , , ,

Dasenbrock, Reed Way. “J.L. Austin and the Articulation of a New Rhetoric.” CCC 38:3 (Oct 1987): 291-305.

Dasenbrock asserts that the foundation for the creation of New Rhetoric lies in the work of J.L. Austin, a philosopher of language who is credited for speech-act theory. He explains Austin’s speech-act theory, which is based in the belief that language is a mode for acting in the world, not of reflecting it. Austin’s theories defend rhetoric from attacks that it is only concerned with persuasion and tropes and show that it is possible to construct a New Rhetoric that more accurately reflects the rhetorical needs of the modern world.   

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.