Revolution Lullabye

January 13, 2009

Weingartner, Fitting Form to Function

Weingartner, Rudolph H. Fitting Form to Function: A Primer on the Organization of Academic Institutions. American Council on Education: Oryx Press, 1996.

x-xviii, 115-117, 19-34

Weingartner’s guide to academic administration, based on 27 maxims that hold true across universities and departments, is grounded in the belief that good administrative decisions are based on an understanding of the relationship between administration and other aspects of the university (namely faculty), and so, in the different chapters of his book, he explains those specific relationships (like the role of the central administration, the deans, etc.) Faculty are independent of administration, and their career is based more in professional, autonomous values than the managerial goals of administrators. Administrators are almost anamolies on academic campuses: they don’t teach, research, or work as part of the more publically-known parts of the university (like a coach); instead, they manage the university’s resources and operations.

Quotable Quotes

Maxim 4: “To what position a given officer reports significantly affects the way in which his or her responsibilities are discharged” (115)

Maxim 18: “The responsibilities of an office must not exceed its authority, including budgetary authority” (116).

“Administrators are not merely called to decide, but to elict decisions from others and to collaborate with others in various ways of decision making, with the dual gaol of making good decisions and doing so in an appropriate way” (xvi)

Notable Notes

universities have many simultaneous functions

faculty objectives don’t come from administration: they “emanate, with few exceptions, from worlds outside the institution that employs [the faculty]” (xii), they act almost like “independent contractors” (xiii)

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