Revolution Lullabye

October 13, 2013

Kroll, The End of the Community College Profession

Kroll, Keith. “The End of the Community College English Profession.” Teaching English in the Two-Year College 40.2 (December 2012): 118-129. Print.

Kroll argues that US community colleges have been overtaken by a neoliberal agenda, shifting the focus of education at community colleges from academics to vocational and career training. Kroll uses Giroux to define neoliberalism as both an economic and political movement that emphasizes private, corporate interests over the public good. Kroll contends that with this market-driven influence, community colleges will continue to prioritize the bottom line over what’s best for education, resulting in an increased reliance on contingent faculty and curriculum that responds to the needs of corporate America. He calls on faculty to teach critical literacy as a counternarrative in their own English and writing classrooms and to push back against this shift by taking on public intellectual roles.

Notable Notes

Courses are valued based on their perceived economic value

Large departments of contingent faculty overseen by a faculty manager (122)

Community colleges haven’t felt the pressure of professional guidelines on class size, etc. published by CCCC, MLA, NCTE (123)

Quotable Quotes

“The ‘grand experiment’ of the community college, as that of ‘Democracy’s college,’ is coming to an end. And with that ending comes the end of the community college’s academic function – that is, to provide an education– and concomitantly the community college English profession” (118).

“Neoliberalism imagines community college curricula as business-driven and focused on job (re)training; defines those who attend community colleges as economic entities:  ‘customers,’ ‘workers,’ and a ‘workforce’; and marks the end of a full-time faculty profession” (119)

“Consequently it has been rather easy for politicians, corporate America, and community college leaders to diminish or ignore the community college’s academic function while steadily turning them into job (re)training centers whose primary mission is to train workers to assume their subservient place in corporate America” (121).

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