Revolution Lullabye

May 25, 2011

Jesuit Pedagogy, The Notebook

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“Jesuit Pedagogy.” The Notebook 11.4

This is a special issue about Jesuit pedagogy published by The Notebook, a publication at Saint Louis University through the Reinert Center for Teaching Excellence. It includes reflections from faculty across a wide variety of disciplines about how they incorporate Jesuit and Ignatian principles in their teaching.

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Ignatian Pedagogy, The Notebook

“Ignatian Pedagogy.” The Notebook 13.1

This is a special issue about Ignatian Pedagogy, published in The Notebook, a publication from the Reinert Center for Teaching Excellence at Saint Louis University. The issue reflects on a 2-day workshop on Ignatian pedagogy.

Hammond, Jay. “Two Simple Techniques that Build Rapport with Students”

Hammond emphasizes the importance of a close teacher-student relationship in Ignatian pedagogy and suggests two ways that teachers can help build those relationships. The first is coming to class early to ask students how they are and how their day is going; the second is quodlibit (what you please), inviting students to ask questions on or off topic. The quodlibit was standard pedagogical practice in medieval institutions. Both ideas also cultivate an environment of conversation, encouraging students to talk and discuss in the classroom.

Sharff, Darcy. “Jesuit Principles We Already Use.”

Sharff notes that her faculty at the School of Public Health already put into place several key tenets of Ignatian pedagogy: asking students to reflect on their experiences, providing students with feedback, and encouraging the cultivation of student-teacher relationships.

May 24, 2011

Mancini, Ignatian Pedagogy in a Diverse University

Mancini, Matthew. “Ignatian Pedagogy in a Diverse University.” The Notebook 13.1 (September 2010) http://www.slu.edu/centers/cte/notebook_ol/13_1/mancini.html.

Mancini addresses the challenge of pursuing a faith-centered Ignatian pedagogy at an institution of higher education, but he warns against “watering down” the pedagogy promoted in the Ratio, arguing that a weakened version of Ignatian pedagogy does not achieve the goals of the pedagogy. He argues that two elements in the Ratio – respecting the digntiy of the individual student by crafting a “developmentally graded” curriculum (with clear objectives) and repetition – can and should be infused in both the college’s whole curriculum (long-range) and in individual courses. This helps build logical, sequential courses that move together (a cohesive inquiry) rather than a course that just goes through a string of “topics.”

Notes and Quotes

Published through Saint Louis University. Special issue on Ignatian Pedagogy.

The challenge: Ignatian pedagogy is “intimately bound to the theological and ethical principles of the Exercises” but modern American universities are, and want to be, diverse places that welcome students, faculty, and staff from all (or no) faith traditions.

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